Care for Kit

Put Your Name On It !
Most important piece of advice – please put your name on each item of kit that you buy. As coaches, we collect large numbers of expensive items of kit each season without an owner. Put your name and club on all items. That way they have a chance of being returned to you even if you are playing away from home.

Knocking In Bats
Most modern bats come already knocked in. However it is still important that they are given a further hour (at least!) knocking in. For most juniors this ends up being a parent’s job but I thoroughly recommend that the player knocks their own bat in. It helps build a greater appreciation of what they have and will encourage them to take better care of it.

To knock in effectively all you need is an old long sock and an old ball. Place the ball in the sock and gently strike the bat with the ball. The whole surface needs to be hit. Be particularily careful around the edges but do not neglect them. This is commonly where splits and cracks can occur.

The flat surface only needs to be knocked in, right up to the handle. This process helps compress and harden the wood and ready it for play. As stated before an hour’s knocking in should be considered the minimum. Sitting in front of the TV is the best way to do it. The bat should not be used in matches or in practice until fully ready.

Once knocked in, avoid playing against poor quality cricket balls as much as you can. These can mark and damage the bat whilst it is still relatively soft.

Bat Protection
Buy a clear film self adhesive protection strip for your new bat and apply it before or after knocking in. This will protect the bat from marks and light damage and these can be changed each season as required.

Fibre glass edge strips should be applied to either edge for further protection to these vulnerble areas. A Toe Guard is a hard piece of plastic applied to the base of the bat where it strikes the ground. If the bat does not come with one or if it falls off, which they frequently do, apply a new one immediatlely. These help prevent cracks and water incursion. They can be cut to size and generally come as a self-adhesve strip.

Finally a carry bag or cover is a really good idea to protect your bat when not in use. More damage happens off the cricket pitch than on it.

At the base of the handle the grip is fixed to the wood by tape. During use, the tape frequently comes adrift and the grip creeps up the handle.
Work the grip gently back down the handle after removing the old tape. Once the grip is again flush wth the top of the handle apply new tape to hold it in position.

Bat Grip
Changing the grip takes a bit of practice and generally juniors grow out of a bat before the grip needs changing. Replacement grips and simple devices to help you change them are available, alternatively ask your club coach or professional to replace it for you.

At the base of the handle the grip is fixed to the wood by tape. During use, the tape frequently comes adrift and the grip creeps up the handle.
Work the grip gently back down the handle after removing the old tape. Once the grip is again flush wth the top of the handle apply new tape to hold it in position.

Test